Brethren Archive



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Martin Arhelger said ...

Short biography: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hall_Brookes

Includes links to many books of him.

Martin

Thursday, Mar 26, 2020 : 03:41
Timothy Stunt said ...

A recent biographer of Brookes acknowledges that Brookes met JND, but dismisses the suggestion that Brookes was influenced by Darby as 'dubious at best' (Carl E. Sanders, The Pre-millennial Faith of James Brookes: Re-examining the Roots of American Dispensationalism, [Lanham MD, 2001] 28-29, 35.  Timothy Stunt.

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 : 22:42
Syd said ...
In Brooke’s “Bible Reading on the Second Coming,” George Needham writes in an introduction: “In the early part of the year 1861, the southern portion of Ireland was visited with the power of God in a very signal manner. Many persons of the Protestant faith, having a name to live, were quickened into newness of life. Lacking opportunity of human teachers, a number of the converts, the writer amongst them, were led to establish a weekly meeting of Bible study. Carefully we sought to compare scripture with scripture, waiting in prayer before the Lord for light on the difficult passages, until the word became living, real, intelligible and precious. A few of the brethren could read the Greek, which helped us in our critical examination of the New Testament, without previous theological training, and as yet ignorant of the foundation doctrines of truth. We had few theories to bring to the word for test or ratification. Coming to the word for instruction, we earnestly sought the way of the Lord. The Bible became very precious in its literalness and adaptation to the needs and craving of the heart. It was then, in journeying through the Gospels, and subsequently, in the Epistles, we discovered the prominence given to the second advent of Christ.”

We know from CH Makintosh’s writings, that a number of “brethren” visited Ireland at this time, acknowledged the work as of God, and assisted in ministry/Bible study. Did some knowledgeable “brethren” assist in the understanding of the rapture? To what extent did this influence reach Brookes? It’s noteworthy that the illustrative diagram of the chronology of Israel, church age, rapture, tribulation, etc, that Brookes uses in his writings, referred to as an “English tract” is of “brethren” source.
Saturday, Nov 27, 2021 : 04:20


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