Brethren Archive

Life in the Future

by R. H. K.




Comments:
Tom said ...
R.H.K. anyone?
Thursday, Mar 2, 2017 : 19:57
Marty said ...
I believe there is a print error on the title page. Should be "H. R. K. (King)
Friday, Feb 15, 2019 : 11:29
Timothy Stunt said ...

But both the copies in the CBA in Manchester (one described as a 'new edition' and one as a '3rd edition') have R.H.K. as the author rather than H.R.K. No explanation is given by Dr Crawford Gribben (in 'Rethinking the Rise of Prophecy Fiction: H.R.K's Life in the Future (?1879) in Bethren Historical Review vii [2011] 68-80) for his reordering of the initials.  Can Marty tell us anything about H.R. King?  Timothy Stunt

Friday, Feb 15, 2019 : 21:36
Marty said ...
Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=1WM0tgEACAAJ&dq=%22Life+in+the+Future%22++King&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiIpsut-b3gAhUC4IMKHWsrC_wQ6AEIKjAA
SOLO Bodleian Oxford: Also has K, H. R.
CBA may have taken it off the scan. Have no other information on either name.
Saturday, Feb 16, 2019 : 00:13
Tom said ...
Saturday, Feb 16, 2019 : 20:45
Tom said ...
There was a Henry Robert Lawrence King (1844-1923) who was living in Ryde at the time. Complete guess though.
Saturday, Feb 16, 2019 : 20:57
Timothy Stunt said ...

The author was evidently quite a scholarly and precise person. In the 2nd ed. (used by Crawford Gribben) he describes (in chapter 2) Jews studying, in the British Museum, the Codex Cottonianus (described as a MS 'containing only a few fragments of the four gospels' from 'the end of the 4th century').  However in this 'New edition — Revised' (pp.9-10,)  the author follows Tregelles in his rewritten edition of volume IV of Horne's Introduction to the Textual Criticism of the New Testament (1856) and states that the fragments in the British Museum were 'in one of the ancient Codices (named Purpureus, marked N)' and that they date 'from the end of the 6th century'.  That he supposed the Jews would have looked at these fragments rather than the Codex Alexandrinus (4th century in the Brit Mus) possibly indicates that he originally thought these gospel fragments were part of another Codex Cottonianus that contains much of Genesis (and which is also in the British Museum), but the fact that he corrected the nomenclature and the dating of the MS suggests a well-informed scholarly approach.   Incidentally the Henry Robert King, living in Ryde was an ironmonger — not that such a factor precludes scholarship — there were many autodidacts among the early Brethren!  Timothy Stunt

Sunday, Feb 17, 2019 : 01:12


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